Habits 365 Breast Cancer Highlights

"Good habits are being proactive when it comes to your health. Getting a yearly mammogram and or sonogram. Especially, if you have a family history of breast cancer. In my case that’s why I made the decision to be tested for the BRCA gene on my 37th birthday. I always knew deep down inside what the outcome would be and now it was time to find out. With my mother dying of breast cancer at 38 and my grandmother at 52. This is where I had to make a change. This would not be my fate. I had two young children and a husband who were MY WORLD!! There was no way I wasn’t going to be around to see them grow up. If there was something I could do to change that, I would. Just as I’d thought the test was positive. Practicing good habits and being proactive helped me and led me to be here TODAY!! I’m 48 I feel great!! I have enjoyed every single moment watching my children and being present with them, my husband, and family. I encourage every woman to be proactive about your health. I cherish my life my health, my family and friends. And, I always remember to stop and take a look and see the beauty in everything around me." 

 

 —Jessica Selmer, NY

 

 

 

"My name is Tamar Winter and I am a breast cancer survivor. I am a wife, a mother of three and a teacher. When I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma, it took me by storm. I was terrified and overwhelmed, but knew I had a long road ahead and needed to put aside my fears and stay positive and strong. With the love and support of my family and friends, I braved the storm and had to move quickly.  I learned throughout my treatment how to manage the side effects and optimize my results. I learned all about the cancer fighting foods and exercised regularly throughout my treatment.

Keeping my hair played a big role in my mood and level of strength. Days before chemotherapy began, I embarked on a project to save my hair from falling out through a process called cold capping. I froze my head for hours during every chemo day, equipped with electric blankets and layers of clothing. It was meticulous and painful, but helped me reclaim my power and feel “less sick” with hair on my head. Radiation took a toll on my left breast and so did a year of transfusions through a painful port in my chest. This was all just part of the storm that would pass and be followed by a beautiful rainbow. I attended as many occasions, birthday parties and bar mitzvahs as possible. I went ice skating and reunited with old and new friends. Since teaching had to take a back seat, I enrolled in classes to learn a new profession in real estate. Victory for me was to dance in the storm instead of waiting for it to pass.

Three years later I feel as strong as ever, I took a terrible disease and made it a positive aspect of my life. I have given back through fundraising and talking to women newly diagnosed, giving them positive energy to help them weather the storm.  My story is one of love, support and triumph, gaining a clear perspective on life, living in the moment and appreciating what I have. "

— Tamar Winter, NY

 

 

 

"As a 14 year breast cancer survivor I like to keep very active. I enjoy walking my dog, hiking and taking spin classes. Exercise is great for the body and soul!"

Rhonda Pliskin, NY

 

 

 

"When i was first diagnosed, my world turned upside down. As a woman in her 70’s with no familial history of breast cancer i was worried... worried for myself, my daughter, my granddaughter and even my son and grandsons. However after the tears and fears, i let my daughter take the reigns. She found the best doctors for me. I knew I’d be ok! I had to be. I’m 3 years cancer free and living my best life. I do not let little things get me down because I’ve had bigger things. Whether playing canasta, doing water aerobics or being with my family and friends i take nothing for granted. What having breast cancer taught me is being grateful. I’m grateful for my husband of almost 55 years. I’m grateful for my children and grandchildren, the friends i have, the sun that rises and sets whether i want to get out of bed or not."— Marsha Rathmnan Witt, CA